Top 4 Reasons Kids Get Totally Confused in Class (and handy tricks for avoiding it)

26 Feb

English: Question marks with transparent backg...

 

We’ve all had that moment before: we think we’ve explained something brilliantly. The kids are nodding and smiling. Our examples were charming and relevant. We know that our kids absolutely understand the concept.

 

And then we ask them to get to work and…it turns out they have no idea what they are supposed to do!

 

Here are a few of the most common reasons this happens:

 

1. You aren’t clearly outlining your goals and agenda. I never go to the movies without watching a preview first, I never order a new dish without reading the description on the menu, and I never book a plane ticket without researching the city I want to visit. Why on earth should I expect my kids to dive into a lesson before they have any idea what it’s about, or where it will take them? The easiest, quickest, most effective way to get  kids on board and invested in your lesson is to spend a little time at the beginning explaining what you are going to do that day and why.

 

2. You are using think-y verbs, rather than action verbs. The most confusing thing you can possibly do is tell your kids to “think about” or “imagine” or “explore” or “look into” or “consider” something. It all sounds very inspiring and academic, but kids have no idea what these verbs really mean (and honestly, neither do I). Ask them to do things that you can physically see them achieve: write, act out, discuss, measure, underline.

 

3. You aren’t scaffolding. Often, tasks that seem obvious to us are actually really complicated to people who are new at them. For example: “take notes” seems easy to adults, but what we’re really asking kids to do is “listen to what I am saying while simultaneously sifting through the information for the most salient points (which you need a lot of context and expertise to determine) while also writing down these salient points in an organized and meaningful fashion using standard outline format.” Take every task–even seemingly simple ones–and break it down into a list of its component parts.  If you aren’t sure that your kids know how to do each and every step, take the time to teach it to them!

 

4. You are using words they don’t know. You wouldn’t believe how often this happens; it’s easy to forget that some kids haven’t been exposed to words like “compare” before. Luckily, this kind of confusion can be avoided by simply asking kids to repeat your explanations back to them in their own words. If they can’t do it, then go back to find the culprit word and add it to your word wall.

 

Have you ever accidentally confused your kids? What happened and how did you fix it? I’d love to hear your ideas.

 

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One Response to “Top 4 Reasons Kids Get Totally Confused in Class (and handy tricks for avoiding it)”

  1. microrrelatososhortstories February 26, 2013 at 2:50 pm #

    All 4 tips are right on target… I’m an Advanced English Highschool Teacher to bilingual students trying to show them the ropes of Academic Writing…at the end of last semester I finally realized and accepted (in mind, body and soul) the IMPORTANCE of being clear on the class objective at the beginning of the semester, at the beginning of the evaluation period and at the start of each class… it helps both the student and the teacher, it defines and even in a way restricts the focus of the student, specially in the age range that I’m working with when they get easily distracted with other teeneage ‘stuff’ …thanks for such informative posts…read you soon, Alexandra

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